No New Year ADHD Resolutions

Welcome to 2015! The holidays are over and our schedules and routines have returned to normal. For those of us with ADHD, the Christmas season can easily become an overwhelming time of disorganization, adjusting to schedule changes, and having our already fragile executive functions challenged. The New Year finally arrives and we are bombarded with adverts, websites, blogs (mine included) and magazines promising to help us make massive life changes this year and forever.

It has been my experience that new year’s resolutions are not a good option for those with ADHD.

Resolution is defined as:

“: the act of finding an answer or solution to a conflict, problem, etc.: the act of resolving something”

Resolving: “the act of analyzing a complex notion into simpler ones; the act of answering (solving); the act of determining”. (Source: Merriam-Webster Dictionary)

ADHD is not something that can be “solved”. I along with many others who struggle with their executive functioning skills would be more than happy to resolve to no longer have ADHD and follow the plan, take the medication, or have the surgery that would forever rid us of this struggle. I’ve never heard of someone making a New Year’s resolution to stop having ADHD; you’d be foolish to attempt this impossible feat.

NYR unattainable

A more realistic way to approach the beginning of 2015 would be making time to do some self-analysis. Ask yourself some key questions about your past year and as you do this invite the spirit of the LORD to help guide you towards an honest reflection. The management of ADHD symptoms can’t be reviewed and addressed in a similar fashion to those who make meaningless resolutions. People who make New Year’s resolutions can afford to fail at them or even forget what they were a few weeks later; they can do this because their resolutions don’t matter, however, our ADHD does matter.

I don’t want to write what has already been written, so instead I will share a link with you from Laurette Willis of PraiseMoves. Her post is addressed for 2014, but there is no time limit on what she has written; it applied last year and it is still applicable in 2015.

Willis follows what she refers to as SMART-ER Goals.

S-Seek God

M-Make a Commitment

A-Ask

R-(w) Rite: the vision

T-Thank God in Advance

E-Expect

R-Receive  

http://praisemoves.com/2013/12/your-smart-er-goals-for-2014/

http://praisemoves.com/goals.pdf

Well… Happy 2015! My hope is that you will have continued growth in your utilization of your faith in God as a resource for managing your ADHD symptoms. Medication helps with brain function, our faith helps us with our spiritual self. These are two areas that don’t need to be at odds with each other. Wishing you a year filled with growth and transformation in your life. Hopefully over the next 50 weeks you will find something of value on my faith based ADHD themed blog that will be of help to you. Peace.

resolution joke

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